RAMC

Medical Officers of the Malta Garrison
1829

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Malta Garrison – 1829

Regimental Medical Officers

Events 1829

Malta Garrison

The following was married in Malta in 1829:

On 17 January 1829, Capt J C Roberts ADC to HE The Hon Sir F C Ponsonby, Garrison Commander and Governor of Malta married Maria, second daughter of D Ross Esq of Calcutta deceased.

The following was christened in Malta in 1829:

Harry Charles Blackader Filder born on 7 May 1828, son of Deputy Commissary General William Filder and his wife Anne was baptized on 30 March 1829.

Uniform Medical Staff

Surgeons and Assistant Surgeons in the infantry wore the uniform of their respective regiment. They wore epaulets of their corresponding rank together with a cocked hat, but were not permitted a sash (Horse Guards Memorandum dated 15 Apr 1829).

From 18 Feb 1830, epaulettes were restored to the medical staff. Purveyors and Deputy Purveyors wore silver epaulettes. Medical staff ranking from Inspector General of Hospitals to Hospital Assistants wore gold epaulettes corresponding with their relative rank in the army.

Army Wives

The number of women and children with several regiments in Great Britain and Ireland permitted to reside with their husbands in barracks was regulated by the Warrant for the Regulation of Barracks, dated 16 March 1824. On 18 March 1829, Horse Guards directed commanding officers that they had no authority to allow more women in barracks than that laid down in the regulations. It ordered that:

1. Every soldier previous to his marriage, with a view to receive the comforts and advantages which HM bounty and the custom of the service extend to married soldiers and to their wives of good character, should obtain the consent of his commanding officer, and state the name and condition of the woman he proposes to marry, and whether she be a spinster or widow.

2. Soldiers who have married without the consent of their commanding officer, shall under no circumstances, be allowed to have their wives in barracks, or to participate in any of the advantages allowed by the regulations of the service to married soldiers. It must explained to the men that their comforts as soldiers, are in a very small degree increased by their marriage while the inconvenience and distress naturally accruing to them from such connection are serious and unavoidable, particularly when regiments are ordered to embark for foreign service, when only six women to 100 men are allowed to proceed with their husbands. On these occasions commanding officers of regiments are placed under considerable embarrassment in making selection of the women who are to be permitted to accompany their husbands abroad, and of those who are to be compelled to return to their friends or their parishes.

War Office Circular dated 14 February 1829, clarified that with reference to the 277th article of the Explanatory Directions of the 17 May 1828, relative to the daily allowances for subsistence of the wives, widows and families of soldiers who may be waiting for passes to enable them to proceed to their homes, I have the Secretary at War direction that the allowance are to be strictly confined to those cases of such women and children as may be left under the charge of a non-commissioned officer, and are in no instances to be issued for the wives and children of soldiers embarking for foreign service, when such women and children are left in charge of the Reserve Companies or under the protection of a portion of the regiment.

References

  1. A list of all the Officers of the Army and Royal Marines. War Office 31 January 1829.
  2. TNA:CO 158/85. Malta 1835 Vol 2 July – December 1835.
  3. Dress Regulation for Army Medical Officers dated Horse Guards 15 April 1829.
  4. TNA:WO 156/122; List of gravestones at the Military and Civil Cemetery 1801 – 1865 and the Quarantine Bastion Cemetery 1819–1867 compiled by the Rev D B L Foster Assistant Chaplain General Western Mediterranean in May 1939.
  5. TNA:WO 17/2133, Returns of the General and Staff Officers of the hospitals attached to the forces in Malta (25 January – 25 December 1829).