RAMC

Medical Officers of the Malta Garrison
1828

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Malta Garrison – 1828

Regimental Medical Officers

Events 1828

Malta Garrison

The average strength of the garrison was: 3,636 rank and file, 254 wives, and 215 male and 221 female children. The population of Malta was 54,918 males and 59,689 females.

A proclamation dated 10 Apr 1828, subjected military and naval personnel to the jurisdiction of the local courts. Soldiers accused of serious crimes were henceforth handed over to the Civil Authorities.

The following was christened in Malta in 1828:

Mary Georgina Balneavis born on 6 March 1828, daughter of Lt Col and Town Major Henry Balneavis and his wife Georgina, was baptised on 7 April 1828.

Medical Students

Up to 1828, young Maltese men could choose to study surgery without following an academic course in Medicine.

The students were trained in surgery by the Principal Surgeon of the Civil Hospital and were examined by the Medical Committee or Board for approval as assistant surgeons or fully fledged surgeons.

Officer Postings

Officers posted overseas were provided with passages in freight ships. The captain of the vessel charged the Commissioners of the Navy for providing the officers' mess. Those who failed to avail themselves of the free passage provided for them, forfeited one fourth of the amount paid by the Commissioners of the Navy on the part of Government.

Passage rates for Malta and the Ionian Islands and the amount forfeited amounted to:

1. Rates charged for the officers mess by the masters of freight ships £25.

2. Amount paid by the officer on embarkation £6

3. Amount paid by the Commissioners of the Navy £19.

4. Amount forfeited by the officer in case of non-embarkation £4 15s.

Horse Guards Order no 463 dated 22 Dec 1827, directed that when an officer received a posting order to join his regiment, he was to record upon the face of the order the time he received it, the mode of conveyance he had adopted and the time of his arrival at his destination. He then delivered the posting order to the paymaster as a voucher or to his commanding officer as an order received and obeyed. The paymaster used the order to claim the marching allowance upon it.

Officers were granted three days to get their affairs in order before proceeding to join their regiment. They were expected to cover a minimum distance of seventy miles a day, and had to submit a special report through their commanding officer to the Adjutant General of the Forces, if delayed by illness or other unavoidable circumstances, irrespective of whether they were entitled to marching allowance or not.

Horse Guards General Order No 464, dated 31 Dec 1827, reminded officers that they were bound to be actually present with their regiments, or departments if on the staff, on or before the day upon which their leave of absence expired, whether stationed at home or abroad.

References

  1. Returns of service of Medical Officers in the Regular Army dated 1 May 1846.
  2. A list of all the Officers of the Army and Royal Marines. War Office 1 February 1828.
  3. United Service Journal and Naval and Military Magazine Part I dated January 1829, p 120.
  4. TNA:WO 17/2134, Returns of the General and Staff Officers of the hospitals attached to the forces in Malta (25 January – 25 December 1828).
  5. Rates payable for officers' passage on freight ships. Naval and Military Magazine Vol III, No VI July 1828.